Women, Fashion, Glamour, Old Hollywood, and Audrey Hepburn.

Ps: I'm horrible about tagging pictures on this blog

Follow me at Rare Audrey Hepburn and Sandra Deevoted
gatsbyswidow:

imwithkanye:

Oscar de la Renta dies at 82

Rest in Peace.
Charade (1963)

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(Source: parks-and-recreation-department, via andquitefrankly)

the60sbazaar:

Vidal Sassoon at work 

the60sbazaar:

Vidal Sassoon at work 

Jean Seberg in Breathless (1960)

(Source: roseydoux, via gatsbyswidow)

voxsart:

1948.
Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, and Benny Goodman.

voxsart:

1948.

Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, and Benny Goodman.

(via deanmartiann)

thefullerview:

(via Pin by Jane Ellsworth Interiors on Greens | Pinterest)

gracefilm:

anothergracekellyblog:

gatabella:

ihideinmymusic:

gatabella:

From Ray Martin’s interview with Audrey Hepburn, 1989:

Ray: Audrey, who did you admire when you worked in Hollywood?
Audrey: Speaking about beauty, I admired Elizabeth Taylor, Ava Gardner and Grace Kelly.
Ray: And did you think these ladies were different from you?
Audrey: Absolutely. I mean they were real beauties.

First of all, thank you gatabella for sharing this —do you have a link to the rest of the interview? I’d love to read. Second, Audrey you were a real beauty, too!

Unfortunately I don’t have the rest of the interview, I found just this part in the community dedicated to Grace on vk.com. I searched for Ray Martin’s interview on the net and didn’t find any mention of it, strangely. However, the phrase is very much Audrey style, she always denied her beauty :)

You guys, I found this! 

Ray Martin’s Favourites: The Stories Behind The Legends

image

Thanks for sharing, gatabella. Audrey was the epitome of modesty. It was/is part of her tremendous appeal. 

Great find! Thanks to both of you.

(via audreyhepburnmemorabilia)

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (1966) You must get discouraged because more people believe in Santa Claus than in you. Well, let’s face it; Santa Claus has had more publicity, but being #2, perhaps you try harder.

(Source: poilcebox, via mattybing1025)

She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful. And let’s not forget that that wasn’t just Annalise taking it off: It was Davis, too—Davis, who remains brave in a world where a New York Times critic can get away with calling her ‘less classically beautiful.’x

(Source: fistoffight, via deanmartiann)

bettybacallbeauty:

Lauren Bacall in Dior magazine - 1954

bettybacallbeauty:

Lauren Bacall in Dior magazine - 1954

(via joanscrawfords)

vzvzvz:

calvinklein:

Behind the scenes: Fall 2014 Calvin Klein white label.

Beautiful shot

vzvzvz:

calvinklein:

Behind the scenes: Fall 2014 Calvin Klein white label.

Beautiful shot

(via kyracan)


"A man doesn’t tell a woman what to do; she tells herself."

"A man doesn’t tell a woman what to do; she tells herself."

(Source: bellecs, via audreyhepbrun)

(Source: float13, via ooo-la-laah)

gatabella:

"So I went over and she was very special — the usual Hollywood starlet, this wasn’t. I was very impressed with Audrey, but everybody there was taken with her. If you’re used to crew members, and makeup people, and wardrobe, then you’d know they reacted differently to her than to the usual starlet. She had something that they all had antennas up for. Audrey comes in, and you don’t forget her.I think, in retrospect, it was that Audrey was such a lady herself. You knew she wasn’t a real princess, but you still gave her deferential treatment. She had class that the average young American girl never had. And, you know, she never changed all her life. All the years that I knew her and worked with her. Wherever she was, in Europe or America, people respected her. I can’t think of anybody else that I have worked with that would have such devotion from her friends.”- photographer Bob Willoughby on Audrey Hepburn

gatabella:

"So I went over and she was very special — the usual Hollywood starlet, this wasn’t. I was very impressed with Audrey, but everybody there was taken with her. If you’re used to crew members, and makeup people, and wardrobe, then you’d know they reacted differently to her than to the usual starlet. She had something that they all had antennas up for. Audrey comes in, and you don’t forget her.
I think, in retrospect, it was that Audrey was such a lady herself. You knew she wasn’t a real princess, but you still gave her deferential treatment. She had class that the average young American girl never had. And, you know, she never changed all her life. All the years that I knew her and worked with her. Wherever she was, in Europe or America, people respected her. I can’t think of anybody else that I have worked with that would have such devotion from her friends.”

- photographer Bob Willoughby on Audrey Hepburn

(via vivienleighed)